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Scottish Country Dancing
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Scottish Country Dancing Works.

What is Scottish Country Dancing?
Scottish Country Dancing is done is a set of 6 or 8 people, normally with the ladies on one side facing the men on the other (the word country is an adaptation of the word contra). There are three main tempos, reel, jig and strathspey. Strathspey time is a slower time and is unique to Scottish Dancing.

Scottish Country Dancing is well known for reducing stress, providing cardiovascular health for both men and women, and building communication in a team.

How could I use SCD in my company?

  • Teamworking and communication
    • dancing as part of a set breaks down barriers between job roles and encourages both understanding boundarys and giving feedback constructively.
  • Celebration
    • A team of experienced dancers can add something different to your conference or award ceremony through providing a display of Scottish Country Dancing to entertain your guests. There are thousands of dances and we can usually find a dance name which reflects the occasion e.g. a cross border project launch "Train Journey North" or "The Happy Meeting".
  • We can tailor the performance to suit any theme or content

Interested?

Please call us on 07854 109277




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© Colin Barnes, 2003 - 2010
This page was last updated on: 28 September, 2010